The Rider

March 17, 2010

We Want You For Juli’s Army

Filed under: Our Volunteers, The Pelotonia Staff — The Blog @ 9:19 AM

There could be no Pelotonia without the small army of volunteers who do such a wonderful job taking care of – and pampering! – all us riders.

They were amazing last year: helpful, friendly, committed and caring.

And now, registration for this year’s army of 1,600-plus volunteers is open. If you’re interested in being a Pelotonia volunteer, or know someone who is, you can sign up online at: http://www.pelotonia.org/ride/volunteer.jsp

Running the show is Juli Capani, Pelotonia’s Volunteer Coordinator.  Last year, Juli, a recent Ohio State graduate, was a volunteer and helped out during opening ceremonies in Columbus and in Athens at the end of the 100-mile ride.

At the time, she had no idea she’d be in charge of Pelotonia’s volunteers a few months later.

“I started working at Pelotonia part time in September and was looking for a job – and then they offered me this job,” Juli said. “I’m really excited, the volunteers are so amazing and so many from last year are coming back.”

How do you like them apples?

Juli’s Army includes about 45 Lead Volunteers, who will be in charge of all the different Pelotonia locations. They will meet on a regular basis with Juli over the next several months and – in turn – the Lead Volunteers will coordinate and prepare their Volunteer Team Members.

This year, volunteers will sign up for specific tasks on specific days, which, Juli says, will make Pelotonia more organized and rewarding for volunteers and, in turn, riders.

Some of the many volunteer jobs include: bike management, rider check in, dorm room management, warehouse crew, route signage and motorcycle support. Some jobs, such as first aid and mechanical support, require specific training and skills, but most require a willingness to lend a hand and be part of Pelotonia.

“It was a great experience and a lot of fun,” said Rod Loveless, one of the Lead Volunteers in Athens last year. “When we showed up, we weren’t exactly sure what to do and what to expect, but what happened was everyone was willing to stick around as long as it took and do whatever it took.”

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